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KING LEAR

by: William Shakespeare


Nothing will come of nothing.

--King Lear, Act I, scene i

Unhappy that I am, I cannot heave
My heart into my mouth: I love your majesty
According to my bond; nor more nor less.

--Cordelia, Act I, scene i

Come not between the dragon and his wrath.

--King Lear, Act I, scene i

Time shall unfold what plighted cunning hides:
Who cover faults, at last shame them derides.

--Cordelia, Act I, scene i

Love is not love
When it is mingled with regards that stand
Aloof from the entire point.

--France, Act I, scene i

She is herself a dowry.

--France, Act I, scene i

Why bastard? wherefore base?
When my dimensions are as well compact,
My mind as generous, and my shape as true,
As honest madam's issue?

--Edmund, Act I, scene ii

This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeit of our own behaviour, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villains by necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion, knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical predominance, drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence; and all that we are evil in, by a divine thrusting on: an admirable evasion of whore-master man, to lay his goatish disposition to the charge of a star!

--Edmund, Act I, scene ii

Have more than thou showest,
Speak less than thou knowest,
Lend less than thou owest,
Ride more than thou goest,
Learn more than thou trowest,
Set less than thou throwest;
Leave thy drink and thy whore,
And keep in-a-door,
And thou shall have more
Than two tens to a score.

--The Fool, Act I, scene iv

Ingratitude, thou marble-hearted fiend,
More hideous, when thou show'st thee in a child
Than the sea-monster!

--King Lear, Act I, scene iv

How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is
To have a thankless child!

--King Lear, Act I, scene iv

Striving to better, oft we mar what's well.

--Albany, Act I, scene iv

Fortune, good-night: smile once more; turn thy wheel!

--Kent, Act II, scene ii

That sir which serves and seeks for gain,
And follows but for form,
Will pack when it begins to rain,
And leave thee in the storm.

--The Fool, Act II, scene iv

Allow not nature more than nature needs,
Man's life is cheap as beast's.

--King Lear, Act II, scene iv

Let not women's weapons, water-drops,
Stain my man's cheeks!

--King Lear, Act II, scene iv

I will do such things,--
What they are, yet I know not: but they shall be
The terrors of the earth.

--King Lear, Act II, scene iv

Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drenched our steeples, drowned the cocks!
You sulphurous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o' the world!
Crack nature's molds, all germens spill at once
That make ingrateful man!

--King Lear, Act III, scene ii

The art of our necessities is strange,
And can make vile things precious.

--King Lear, Act III, scene ii

He that has and a little tiny wit,
With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,
Must make content with his fortunes fit,
Though the rain it raineth every day.

--The Fool, Act III, scene ii

There was never yet fair woman but she made mouths in a glass.

--The Fool, Act III, scene ii

The prince of darkness is a gentleman.

--Edgar, Act III, scene iv

He's mad, that trusts in the tameness of a wolf, a horse's health, a boy's love, or a whore's oath.

--The Fool, Act III, scene vi

When we our betters see baring our woes
We scarcely think our miseries our foes.

--Edgar, Act III, scene vii

The lowest and most dejected thing of fortune,
Stands still in esperance, lives not in fear:
The lamentable change is from the best;
The worst returns to laughter.

--Edgar, Act IV, scene i

And worse I may be yet: the worst is not,
So long as we can say, This is the worst.

--Edgar, Act IV, scene i

As flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods, —
They kill us for their sport.

--Gloucester, Act IV, scene i

You are not worth the dust which the rude wind
Blows in your face.

--Albany, Act IV, scene ii

She that herself will sliver and disbranch
From her material sap, perforce must wither
And come to deadly use.

--Albany, Act IV, scene ii

Wisdom and goodness to the vile seem vile:
Filths savour but themselves.

--Albany, Act IV, scene ii

It is the stars,
The stars above us, govern our conditions.

--Kent, Act IV, scene iii

A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears: see how yond justice rails upon yon simple thief. Hark, in thine ear: change places; and, handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief?

--King Lear, Act IV, scene vi

Get thee glass eyes;
And like a scurvy politician, seem
To see the things thou dost not.

--King Lear, Act IV, scene vi

When we are born, we cry that we are come
To this great stage of fools.

--King lear, Act IV, scene vi

There thou mightst behold the great image of authority: a dog's obeyed in office.

--King Lear, Act IV, scene vi

Through tatter'd clothes small vices do appear;
Robes and furr'd gowns hide all. Plate sin with gold,
And the strong lance of justice hurtless breaks;
Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw does pierce it.

--King Lear, Act IV, scene vi

Reason in madness!

--Edgar, Act IV, scene vi

Men must endure
Their going hence, even as their coming hither:
Ripeness is all.

--Edgar, Act V, scene ii

The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices
Make instruments to plague us.

--Edgar, Act V, scene iii

The weight of this sad time we must obey;
Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say.
The oldest hath borne most: we that are young
Shall never see so much, nor live so long.

--Edgar, Act V, scene iii

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